According to the National Fire Protection Association, there was an average of 353,100 house fires between 2014–2018 in the United States1. In 2019, a home structure fire was reported every 93 seconds2

Your roof is a powerful part of your house that protects you from cold, dirt, snow, rain, wind and more. But how does your roof perform in the event of a fire? If your roof isn’t fireproofed, it can significantly increase the damage of a fire and possibility of injury to you. There are necessary steps to take to fireproof your roof.

Check the Fire Ratings of Your Roof

Some roofing materials have better fire-resistance ratings, which rank from Class A to C. Fiberglass materials have a Class A rating and are highly resistant, whereas more organic materials like wood shingles have a Class C rating. If you’re getting work done on your roof, speak with the contractor about the type of roofing materials being used on your home. Higher-class materials usually cost a little more, but it’s worth the investment if it means less damage in the event of a fire.

Repair Holes & Gaps in Your Roof

Look over your roof and make repairs on any holes or gaps you find. Even if you have a roof with the best quality roofing materials, a fire could still sneak through holes or gaps in your roof and get into the less protected areas underneath.

Reduce Vegetation Around Your Roof

We’ve noted before how important it is to your roof’s health to regularly trim branches, gutter leaves and other vegetation around your roof; they can fall and/or rip up the shingles on your roof. They can also be kindling for possible house fires and make it easier for a house fire to spread.

Contact ERD Roofing Professionals

Every roof has a limited life span and will occasionally show signs of aging. Did you notice a hole or issue with your roof? Contact Exterior Remodel & Design so our roofing professionals can effectively repair your roof and provide fire-resistant protections to it. Feel free to ask any questions about how to fire-proof your home!

1: nfpa.org/News-and-Research/

2: nfpa.org (US Fire Loss 2019)